Sunday, 3 July 2016

Papers and Books by Thomas Yaeger listed at Academia.edu

Brief summaries of documents and books published and in progress. Three of the papers at Academia.edu are available for download in PDF format.


PAPERS

The Babylon Mis Pi Ritual

One of three chapters in 'The Sacred History of Being' which discuss Mesopotamian
ritual for the installation of Divine images. The Babylon ritual dates from the 6th century B.C.E.
The chapter is based on the critical edition of the texts from Nineveh and Babylon,
'The Induction of the Cult Image in ancient Mesopotamia', published in 2001, by Christopher
Walker and Michael Dick. 'The Sacred History of Being' was published as an eBook, November 2, 2015. Available from Barnes & Noble, Itunes, Kobo, Blio, Inktera, Smashwords, etc.
Mesopotamian Religions, Ancient Near East, Ancient Mesopotamian Religions, Assyrian archaeology, Assyrian Empire,

One of three chapters in 'The Sacred History of Being'  which discuss Mesopotamian ritual for the installation of Divine images. The Nineveh ritual dates from the 7th century B.C.E. The chapter is based on the critical edition of the texts from Nineveh and Babylon, 'The Induction of the Cult Image in ancient Mesopotamia', published in 2001, by Christopher Walker and Michael Dick. 'The Sacred History of Being' was published as an eBook, November 2, 2015. Available from Barnes & Noble, Itunes, Kobo, Blio, Inktera, Smashwords, etc.
Historical Theology, Mesopotamian Archaeology, Mesopotamian Religions, Ancient Near East, Assyria


Available for download. This paper contains extensive information about the Adapa discipline and its role in the preparation for kingship in Sargonid Assyria, and the the place of both within the Assyrian model of the world. Both the myth and the discipline of Adapa can be argued to have been of central cultural importance in the Sargonid period; the evidence for this is particularly strong in the textual remains of the later kings, Esarhaddon and Ashurbanipal. This aspect of the kingship illuminates the self-perception of the Sargonids perhaps more clearly and concisely than any other single form of evidence, and may even constitute the backbone of that self-perception, providing the order about which the other types of evidence ought to be arranged.
Theology, Assyriology, Ancient myth and religion, Neo-Assyrian studies, Ashurbanipal,

This is a chapter from Part 3 of 'The Sacred History of Being' (published as an ebook, November 2, 2015). It looks at the names of the gods listed as aspects of Marduk in the Enuma Elish (the liturgy of the Babylonian New Year Festival), and their associated properties and attributes, as an aggregation of the characteristics understood to be necessary for the proper exercise of Mesopotamian kingship.
Mesopotamian Religions, Ancient Philosophy, Babylon, Mesopotamian literature, Ancient Near Eastern Religions,

An exploration of a pattern of ideas expressed in both divine ritual and the architecture of royal palaces of the Neo-Assyrian period, including reference to Pauline Albenda's pioneering work on the use of carpet design in palace decoration. Some borrowings from Egyptian iconography are discussed. The paper is under revision, and will be available as a chapter in the follow-up to 'The Sacred History of Being': 'The Janus Perplex', (forthcoming).
History of Ideas, Symbolism, Liminality, Assyria, Ancient Egyptian Iconography


This is a chapter from 'The Sacred History of Being'  published as an eBook, November 2, 2015. Available from Barnes & Noble, Itunes, Kobo, Blio, Inktera, Smashwords, etc. The book argues a Mesopotamian origin for the philosophical understanding of the divine, at least as far back as the middle of the 2nd Millennium BCE. The chapter looks at the Old Testament prohibition of images as a diachronic development, much of which seems to post date the Babylonian Exile. Aniconism is explored as a marker of the presence of a philosophical conception of the divine, which, by its nature, can have no shape, colour or form. The chapter compares this interpretation with Tertullian's later discussion of the nature of idolatry.
Philosophy, Philosophy Of Religion, Biblical Theology, Aniconism, Plato and Platonism,


This is a chapter from Part 3 of 'The Sacred History of Being' (published November 2, 2015). It explores the common understanding of Ocean as a generative power in Greece and Mesopotamia, and the use of the associated symbol of the serpent.  Available from Barnes & Noble, Itunes, Kobo, Blio, Inktera, Smashwords, etc.
Philosophy, Symbolism, Ancient myth and religion, Ancient Greece, Neo-Assyrian studies,

This is a chapter from 'The Sacred History of Being' (published November 2, 2015). Plato scholars are for the most part split into two camps - those who think that Plato taught a consistent doctrine, though it is hard to understand what it was because of apparent inconsistencies; and those who think that Plato was undertaking research, in which case the inconsistencies in his arguments can be read as the result of his changing viewpoint over time. This chapter reviews two hundred years of Platonic scholarship, including stylometric analysis of his works, and compares modern scholarly views of Plato with an alternative view from late antiquity (Olympiodorus). Available from Barnes & Noble, Itunes, Kobo, Blio, Inktera, Smashwords, etc.
Philosophy, History of Ideas, Plato, Ancient Greek Religion, Plato and Platonism,

This is a chapter from Part 2 of 'The Sacred History of Being' (published November 2, 2015). The chapter establishes Plato's understanding of the nature of transcendent reality by means of close examination of two key dialogues - the Timaeus and the Sophist, with reference to many of his other dialogues.  Available from Barnes & Noble, Itunes, Kobo, Blio, Inktera, Smashwords, etc.
Philosophy, Ontology, History of Ideas, Plato, Philosophical Theology,


The symbolism of the Sacred Tree was referenced in a number of contexts in Assyria,
including in connection with gates and thrones. This paper, first drafted in 2005,
discusses some of the variant forms of the Sacred Tree, and will be published in the
follow-up to 'The Sacred History of Being': 'The Janus Perplex' (forthcoming 2017).
Assyriology, Mesopotamian Archaeology, Mesopotamia History, Mesopotamian Religions,
Assyria

BOOKS

A great deal of worthless prose has been written on Akhenaten, Egypt's 'heretic' king. Mostly because we have a fragile grasp of Egyptian ideas about the gods, and the implex of ideas surrounding Egyptian theology. The experience of the dynasties which preceded Akhenaten give us some clues as to what was happening in Egypt in the middle of the 2nd millennium B.C.E., and suggest why the 13th to 17th Dynasties were entirely excluded from mention in at least one public record of Egyptian history. Akhenaten's heresy was just the icing on the cake. Forthcoming, 2018.
Religion, Ancient Egyptian Religion, Egyptology, Egyptian Archaeology, History of Egyptology,

An investigation into the role of the idea of limit in the ancient world, and ideas which are related to it. Subjects explored include: collection and division; nominal and verbal understandings of Being; the concept of the threshold in Assyria; the concept of the threshold in Greece and Rome; and the function of the limit as a technical abstraction. Forthcoming, 2017.
Religion, Philosophy, Theology, Phoenicians, Assyrian archaeology,

This is a record of a seminar series held at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, during the Spring Term of 1990. The seminars were organised by Amelie Kuhrt and John North. The speakers were, in addition to the organisers of the series, Philip Lomas, Tim Cornell, Robert Morkot, Edith Hall, Andrew Sherratt, Chloe Chard, Alex Potts, Sue Frankenstein, and Daniel Pick. Only one of the presentations was formally published (Edith Hall's contribution, which appeared in Arethusa in 1992). Forthcoming, 2016.
Ancient History, Phoenicians, Historiography, Carthage (Archaeology), History of Egyptology,

The argument that the discipline of philosophy was not invented by the Greeks, but was in existence elsewhere, and as far back as the middle of the second millennium BCE, has been gaining ground over recent years. The detail of its presence can be traced in the civilizations around the ancient Near East, and particularly in Assyria and Babylonia. The Sacred History of Being collects some of the key evidence together, and examines the idea of the divine as a philosophical concept in Greece, Israel, and ancient Assyria. Published as an eBook, November 2, 2015. Available from Barnes & Noble, Itunes, Kobo, Blio, Inktera, Smashwords, etc.
Philosophy, Ontology, History of Ideas, Theology, Assyriology,




















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